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LibraryThing: OU History of Science Collections HSCI 3013 - section 995 - Spring 2014

Reflection + Peer Responses

# Due Date Pts Activity Time
6 Monday
11:59 p.m.
10 Reflection + Peer Responses
Think about all that you did this week, including reading the Interpretation Essays of other students, and share your thoughts and ideas with other students in the class
30 min.

Due: Monday, 11:59 p.m.
Points: 10
Plan: 30 mins.

At the end of each week, think about all that you discovered by completing the assignments and by reading the Interpretation Essays of other students. How have your ideas changed? What was your most meaningful discovery?

Learning Objective: The weekly Reflection assignment helps you to step back and take a broader perspective, and to creatively reflect on the week's work, and to engage in discussion with other students in the class.

Four Steps: This assignment has the following steps, described below, which must be completed in the following order:

  1. Peer responses to two other students' Interpretations. (2 pts)
  2. "Famous Last Words" for your own Starting Assumptions. (1 pt)
  3. "Famous Last Words" for your own Interpretation essay. (1 pt)
  4. Reflections Essay expressing personal reflections on the week's learning. (2 pts)

1. Peer responses to two other students' Interpretations (2 pts)
You will read and respond to other students' Interpretations at Confluence.

The Interpretation essay provides a setting for interesting interaction with your fellow students about the material you are learning each week. I strongly believe that interaction with other students in a way that is not mediated by the instructor is one of the chief advantages of an online course. When you read others' Interpretations, pause and do your best to understand where they are coming from. Take advantage of this opportunity to get to know them; you will be "seeing" a lot of them online through the course of the semester. Many students find this student-to-student interaction to be one of their favorite aspects of the course!

Each week, you are required to respond to at least two other students. Just hit the Add Reply button, or you can click on the Add Reply link that appears as part of their post (just under their name on the left hand side). When you write your responses, make your comments as specific and as analytical as possible (obviously, sarcasm, combativeness and hyperbole are inappropriate here!). You are expected to provide at least two or three sentences in your reply, making it clear that you have read what the other student wanted to say, and that you have taken a few minutes to think carefully and analytically about what you want to say in your reply.

2. "Famous Last Words" for your own Starting Assumptions (1 pt)
Post a final response to your own Starting Assumptions in Confluence. Revisit your Starting Assumptions and comment on how they may have changed since you wrote them. Your response should make it clear that you have read the comments that others have left for you.

3. "Famous Last Words" for your own Interpretation (1 pt)
Post a final response to your own Interpretation in Confluence. Your response should make clear that you have read the comments that others have left for you.

Note: You must wait until there is at least one reply to your Starting Assumptions and to your Interpretation in order to complete the "Famous Last Words" steps. Please make clear that you have read the replies that other people have left for you. I do read the "Famous Last Words" that people post, and if it seems like you are not reading the replies left by the other students, you will hear from me...

4. Reflections Essay expressing personal reflections on the week's learning (2 pts)
Each week write a short (250-500 words) personal creative essay reflecting on the week's readings and topics. Instead of dealing with historical evidence like the Interpretation essay, in this Reflection you may convey subjective impressions like a journal. And instead of dealing with one narrow issue, this essay differs from the Interpretation essay by taking the broadest possible perspective and encompassing the entire week's work (potentially including all of the issues raised by any participants, not just the one you wrote about in your Interpretation). It is a chance for you to reflect on what you learned during the week, and how the comments of the other students might have contributed to your learning experience. Did anything this week light a fire? (See Yeats quote below.) It also gives you the opportunity to offer reflections on how what you are learning is affecting the making of your Wikipedia Editing Project. After you write your brief essay, post it at Confluence. Create a New Topic on Confluence when you post your Reflection, just as you did when you posted your Starting Assumptions and Interpretation, by clicking the New Topic button in Confluence.

Most of the writing you do in this course is for other students, and to preserve the environment for student-to-student interaction, I rarely post comments to the Interpretation essays (although I do read at least one third of them to get a sense of the ongoing conversations that have started, and to spot check for any problems or difficulties that may arise). However, in the Reflections you are writing not only for yourself, but also for me. I always read each and every Reflection.

About the due date: Sunday 11:59 p.m. A lot of students will choose to complete this assignment on Sunday night, right around the deadline, but this is NOT a wise schedule! You are absolutely not required to do this work on Sunday! A lot of students will be doing this assignment on Friday, or even earlier. In fact, keep your weekend completely free of class work if you want, and finish this and all the week's assignments on Friday instead of waiting until Sunday/Monday. The choice is up to you!

Here are the instructions you will see for the Reflection and Peer Responses assignment:

Instructions for the Reflection and Peer Responses (complete steps in order):

  1. Respond to the Interpretation essays for this week by at least two other students.
    If you are working ahead, you may have to check back later to complete this part of the assignment. Please respond to Interpretations with 0 responses first; once every Interpretation has at least one response, you are free to choose any to respond to.
  2. Re-read your own Starting Assumptions post, and read later comments of others, looking especially for any comments that are related to your own post. Your response should make it clear that you have read the comments of others as well as your own.
  3. Re-read your own Interpretation. There must be at least one response before you can complete this step.Your response should make it clear that you have read the comments that others have left for you.
  4. Consider what you have learned this week, from the Starting Assumptions to the Interpretation exercises, and post your personal reflections, 300 words minimum, as a comment on your Interpretation.
  5. Write a personal Reflection, 300 words minimum.
  6. Copy-and-paste your Reflection and post it in the Discussion forum for this week.
  7. Complete the Gradebook Declaration. Your Gradebook Declaration is subject to the Honor Code.
 

Here is the text of the Gradebook Declaration:

(2 points) I have replied to the Interpretation of at least one other student at Confluence.
(2 points) I have replied to the Interpretations of two other students at Confluence.
(2 points) I have posted my Starting Assumptions "Famous Last Words" at Confluence.
(2 points) I have posted my Interpretation "Famous Last Words" at Confluence.
(2 points) I have posted my Reflection (300 words min.) at Confluence.

"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." William Butler Yeats

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HSCI 3013. History of Science to 17th centuryCreative Commons license
Kerry Magruder, Instructor, 2004
-14
Brent Purkaple, TA

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Many thanks to the pedagogical model developed in Mythology and Folklore and other online courses by Laura Gibbs, which have been an inspiration for this course.

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